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Queen Elizabeth II Stadium

Two-storey concrete sports pavilion in streamlined 1930s style. Distinctive 'drum' contains stylised staircase leading to glass-walled cafe and sheltered spectator seating.

Date

1977/2013.

Donkey Lane, Enfield EN1 3PL

Sat/Sun 10am-1pm. Max 10 at one time.

Enfield Town

191, 217, 317

  • Free parking
  • Access for wheelchair users
  • Toilets available

The sports pavilion is a period piece designed in a streamlined 30s modern style, taking its cue from Dudok and Holden. Construction began in 1939 but was interrupted by the war (a prisoner of war camp having been built near Donkey Lane) so the structure was not completed until 1952. Generated by the plan and with modest allusions to the Bauhaus idiom, it takes the form of a linear two-storey building curved at the ends with flat roofs and projecting canopy eaves. The asymmetrical massing of volumes culminates in a tall drum containing a curving stylised staircase up to the Central Caf‚ at first floor level, a room which with its fully-glazed Crittall walls has a light and airy feel. The curved walls of the drum are mirrored by an internal wall containing a serving hatch. At ground floor level are separate male and female changing rooms, service rooms and public toilets. On the first floor, there is sheltered seating for spectators and a deck promenade running around the front, sides and rear of the building. The very obvious reinforced concrete frame structure of the building is employed to greatest effect in the Caf‚ where it is fully on show. The stock brick infill and metal railings (originally painted pale blue) add pleasing details to this carefully thought out building. Externally, the _greening_ focuses attention on the entry points. Alas, the immediate setting of the building is lost by the harsh, hard landscape treatment. The building was refurbished in 1977 and its quality is recognised by its local listing.The King George_s Playing Field is situated west of Great Cambridge Road on former market garden land called Bury Farm, an area where rich arable land and hunting forest had existed since before the Domesday records. It was purchased in 1931 by Enfield UDC, one of the largest acquisitions to date, thereby continuing its policy of providing public open space at a time when farm land was being developed for housing. The land provided an abundance of grass pitches for popular ball sports, a section leased to Enfield FC, a short-lived miniature golf course (lost to allotments during World War II), a spacious open air swimming pool (demolished in 1998 after being closed for many years) and the facilities building with running track. The sports pavilion is a period piece designed in a streamlined 30s modern style, taking its cue from Dudok and Holden. Construction began in 1939 but was interrupted by the war (a prisoner of war camp having been built near Donkey Lane) so the structure was not completed until 1952. Generated by the plan and with modest allusions to the Bauhaus idiom, it takes the form of a linear two-storey building curved at the ends with flat roofs and projecting canopy eaves. The asymmetrical massing of volumes culminates in a tall drum containing a curving stylised staircase up to the Central Caf‚ at first floor level, a room which with its fully-glazed Crittall walls has a light and airy feel. The curved walls of the drum are mirrored by an internal wall containing a serving hatch. At ground floor level are separate male and female changing rooms, service rooms and public toilets. On the first floor, there is sheltered seating for spectators and a deck promenade running around the front, sides and rear of the building. The very obvious reinforced concrete frame structure of the building is employed to greatest effect in the Caf‚ where it is fully on show. The stock brick infill and metal railings (originally painted pale blue) add pleasing details to this carefully thought out building. Externally, the _greening_ focuses attention on the entry points. Alas, the immediate setting of the building is lost by the harsh, hard landscape treatment. The building was refurbished in 1977 and its quality is recognised by its local listing. For more information see :- B Cherry & N Pevsner, The Buildings of England, London 4 : North (1998; Penguin Books) Ed. Weinreb & Hibbert, The London Encyclopaedia (1983; Macmillan) Graham Dalling, Enfield Past (1999; Historical Publications Ltd)