×
Select Page

Woolwich Arsenal Clock Tower

When the historic clocktower at the Royal Woolwich Arsenal suffered almost total destruction, Ramboll's conservation engineers employed analysis and traditional detailing to maximise its restoration. 3D modelling, repair and testing of salvaged elements allowed over 85% of the original materials to be restored and reinstated.

Architect

A&Q Partnership/Ramboll

Date

1805/2011.

Duke of Wellington Avenue SE18 6SS

Sat/Sun 1pm-5pm. Regular talks/tours with engineer of restoration. Max 10 per tour.

Woolwich Arsenal

  • Access for wheelchair users
  • Regularly open to the public at no charge

WOOLWICH ARSENAL CLOCK TOWER Building on HeritageThe Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, is among Britain_s most important historic sites, playing a central military and industrial role throughout the country_s imperial phase, from the late seventeenth century to the early twentieth. The Arsenal received its Royal Warrant in 1805 having been initially established in 1694 for the development of ordnance, the early buildings of which still remain.As part of a major expansion during the Napoleonic Wars, the Royal Carriage Factory was erected, 1802-5, to provide gun carriages for the extensive artillery deployment in Europe. The North Range of the former carriage works included a central Clocktower.When this Grade II Listed Clocktower collapsed in 2008 it was essential that as much of the historic fabric and heritage features that could be restored were conserved for future generations. The diligence and meticulous attention to detail by the design team and contractors allowed over 85% of the original materials to be reinstated in the restoration. The works undertaken using matched materials and traditional detailing during the residential redevelopment by Berkeley Homes allow the Clocktower a sustainable future at the heart of the new community.- Royal Arsenal Heritage site.- Clock by J.Thwaites of Clerkenwell- Bells by Thomas Mears & Sons, Whitechapel- Conservation of over 85% of original.- Restoration in traditional detailing.